Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Design and Production Engineering Berlin,Germany.

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Wolfgang Gentzsch

President and Co-founder of the UberCloud Community

Keynote: Digital manufacturing - From design to the internet of things

Time : 9.00 AM to 9.30 AM

OMICS International Design and Production 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wolfgang Gentzsch photo
Biography:

Wolfgang Gentzsch is the president and co-founder of the UberCloud Community and Marketplace for engineers and scientists to discover, try, and buy computing on demand, in the cloud. From 2010 to 2015, he was the co-chairman of the International ISC Cloud & Big Data Conference series. Previously, he was Advisor to the EU projects EUDAT and DEISA, directed the 150 Million Euro German D-Grid Initiative, and was a member of the Board of Directors of the Open Grid Forum and of the US President's Council of Advisors for Science and Technology, PCAST. Previously, he was a Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics at several universities in the US and Germany, and held leading positions at the North Carolina Grid and Data Center in Durham, Sun Microsystems in California, the DLR German Aerospace Center in Gottingen, and the Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma physics in Munich. In the 90s, he founded HPC software companies Genias and Gridware. The latter, which has been acquired by Sun Microsystems in 2000, developed the well-known distributed cluster workload and management system Grid Engine.

Abstract:

In recent years new and revolutionary trends in digital manufacturing are overwhelming our community. Design, simulation and prototyping more and more are moving to the cloud, and new areas like big data, predictive analytics, and the Internet of Things are coming up the horizon, accompanied by great promise for increased product quality, reduced product failures, and better predictability for market acceptance and customer use. This talk will touch on all these new trends, and illustrate with one example in more detail the benefits of these new paradigms: Computer Aided Engineering Simulations in the Cloud. Although today still the majority especially of small and medium manufacturers don't perform computer simulations at all or just on their local workstations, there is now a strong trend toward adding more powerful hardware and software to their daily tools. In a sudden, today, engineers can access the whole spectrum of computing, from their workstation to servers to clouds, integrated with feature rich application simulation software for e.g. fluid dynamics, material analysis, multi-physics, and more. In our talk, we will analyse the roadblocks and benefits of these powerful tools and demonstrate how they are currently overcome by new technologies such as application software containers running seamlessly on any computing resource on demand. We will close our talk with several digital manufacturing case studies demonstrating this progress.

Keynote Forum

Omar S. Es-Said

Loyola Marymount University, USA

Keynote: On the correlation of charpy impact energy and hydrogen charging in 4340 steel

Time : 09:30AM to 10:00AM

OMICS International Design and Production 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Omar S. Es-Said photo
Biography:

Omar S Es-Said is a Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Loyola Marymount University in LA, California. He was a full Professor from 1998 to present. He received his PhD in Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science from the University of Kentucky, Lexington in 1985. His current research interests include metallic processing and modeling. He published over 300 papers. He has been an Associate Editor from 2008 to present for the Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance. He received several grants and awards for research funds for a total of over $3.6 million. He was a consultant for the Navy from 1994-2015 and a fellow of the American Society of Materials in 2005.

Abstract:

Three experiments were performed on the effect of hydrogen charging on the charpy impact toughness of 4340 steel. In the first experiment 4340 steel plates were austentized and tempered to give the following target tensile strength values of: 1000, 1102, 1170, 1240, 1310, 1410, 1515, and 1720 MPa. Charpy impact samples were tempered at each of these temperatures. These samples were separated into uncharged and hydrogen charged samples. The charged samples were then plated with 0.0076 to 0.013 mm thickness layer of cadmium. It was found that samples tempered above 468°C and subjected to hydrogen charging exhibited lower impact energy values when compared to un-charged samples. No significant difference between charged and un-charged samples tempered below 468°C was observed. In a second experiment steel plates were Electro Discharge Machined into twenty-four compact tension fracture toughness bars. These samples were divided into four groups: as-received, tempered, cadmium coated, and cadmium coated and tempered. The cadmium coating was 0.013 mm in thickness. The tempering temperatures were 354°C, 468°C, and 621°C, for two hours. Also, charpy impact samples were treated in the same way. A correlation between the fracture toughness and Charpy Impact values was obtained. In a third experiment tempered 4340 steel was hydrogen charged by cadmium plating of 0.005 mm, 0.0076 mm, and 0.013 mm. It was found that charpy impact energy was highest for the 0.005 mm and lowest for the 0.013 mm across all strength values. The results can be explained by the model of (hydrogen) atmospheres associated with mobile dislocations.

  • Design Engineering | Industrial Design
Speaker

Chair

Shpend Gerguri

Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdom

Speaker

Co-Chair

Peter Burggraf

RWTH Aachen University, Germany

Session Introduction

Jorge Angeles

McGill University, Canada

Title: Towards a Theory of Engineering Design

Time : 10:00-10:25

Speaker
Biography:

Jorge Angeles is currently working as Professor in McGill University, Montreal, Canada. He completed his Ph.D. in Applied Mechanics from Stanford University in 1973 and M.Ing. in Mechanical Engineering, UNAM in 1970. Dipl Eng National Autonomous University of Mexico in Mechanical-Electrical. His research interests reflect in his wide range of publications in various national and international journals

Abstract:

The best known design schools (the German School, Axiomatic Design, Robust Engineering and TIPS) are evoked and approached with a critical view in this paper. An eclectic approach leads to a united framework that can form the foundations of a Theory of Engineering Design, which seems to be lacking, mostly because the various schools appear reluctant to combine among themselves. Using the Mathematical Theory of Communication, along with the Information Axiom of Axiomatic Design, the complexity of a design variant at the conceptual phase of the design process is denned. It is shown that, upon resorting to Taguchi's loss function, the type complexity of design components within a special context e.g., pin joint vs. sliding joint in machine design, can be exploited to associate a complexity measure to these joints for comparison purposes. Designers are known to prefer the former to the latter, whenever a choice is possible, based on the sticky-drawer elect that is found in sliding joints. While this is common knowledge in mechanical design, a formalization of the practice has been elusive. In mechanical design, other related criteria than type complexity are to be brought into play. These are number complexity (the larger the number of function-carriers, the more complex a design variant); manufacturing complexity; and assembly complexity, among many others that depend on the context. While the examples used to illustrate the foregoing concepts are limited to mechanical design, they have been also applied to robot design, where other disciplines, like actuator and sensor technology, play a significant role. Moreover, the basic concepts have been ex-tended to the embodiment stage, upon establishing a model-based version of Taguchi's robust engineering.

Speaker
Biography:

Shpend has completed his PhD at Oxford Brookes University in the area of metal-to-ceramic joints. He is a Senior Lecturer in Engineering Design and Subject Coordinator for BEng/MEng Automotive and Mechanical Engineering fields. He has many years of experience in managing academic projects in product design from conception to completion. In terms of research and knowledge transfer activities Shpend performs extensive consultancy for various well known organisations, leads various Technology Strategy Board (TSB) funded industrial partnerships as well as being recognised as the designer of the first UK-built bamboo bike.

Abstract:

Rapid manufacture, such as 3D printing stereolithography is being utilised in many manufacturing sectors where the demand for assessing products at an early stage of the design cycle is of paramount importance. In the case of 3D printed parts made from plastic materials, some of the limitations for the parts to be utilised as load bearing structures stem as a result of the inherent low material property values, for example stiffness, tensile strength and elongation at break. One way these can be accounted for is by optimising the shape of the part, and this is shown here by a detailed case study of 3D printed lugs made from VeroGray RGD850 as part of the development of ‘next generation’ bamboo bicycle frame. The RP machine used to print the lugs is Object30 Prime PolyJet. The optimisation process is based on the theory of inventive problem solving (TRIZ), by the followings steps: system functional analysis; subject-action-object; derivation of technical curves and the determination and translation of inventive principles into lug concepts. These concepts are simulated using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) for their load-bearing capabilities and conclusions drawn on the applicability of TRIZ principles on providing optimised solutions for structural parts is demonstrated.

Break: Coffee Break 10:50-11:05 @ Main Lobby

Craig Chapman

Birmingham City University, United Kingdom

Title: The utilisation of knowledge for the rapid development of design engineering solutions

Time : 11:05-11:30

Speaker
Biography:

Craig Chapman, CEng MIED MIET is Head of the Advanced Design Engineering Centre and Director of the Knowledge Based Engineering Lab at Birmingham City University. He has worked at an international level working in Europe, USA and the UK, holding positions in industry from Director, Principal Design Engineer, Design Group Leader and Senior Applications Consultant. The main focus of his career has been research, development and the application of design engineering automation and the development of Knowledge Based Engineering (KBE) solutions, enabling companies to rapidly respond to design engineering changes and explore multiple solutions with consideration to all life cycle phases. He is a visiting Lecturer at the University of Warwick and NTNU. He also delivers KBE courses into industry. KBE Research partners have included Rolls-Royce, Jaguar Land Rover, BAE Systems, Morgan Motor Company, Daewoo, Ascamm Technological Centre and TechnoSoft Inc.

Abstract:

A Need to Rethink the Solution? – CAD has evolved from simple drafting and analysis tools. Our present systems automate small and often isolated tasks within the overall engineering process. CAD systems have been extended by programmatic means to assist the engineer in localised application areas and in the optimisation of specialist part objects. To go further we must take a holistic view of design. To overcome the limitations set by the traditional design tools, we are now seeing an evolution in our design systems, one where the knowledge of the actual process is being represented. The specifications are being transformed into sets of attributed objects, which act together to satisfy the specification. One of the methods being used and researched to acquire, represent, store, reason and communicate the intent of the design process is Knowledge Based Engineering. The systems should give back the time to be an engineer. A true CAD system should be able to draw from a company’s natural knowledge base, the accumulated experience of the workforce and more importantly have the ability to utilise that knowledge in the pursuit of a solution(s). This talk will explore the modelling of design engineering processes to develop our products and the utilisation of our existing corporate knowledge, showing examples and discussing methods to model the complex systems being automated.

Peter Burggräf

RWTH Aachen University, Germany

Title: Quo Vadis, industrial production? Factories in the global environment

Time : 11:30-11:55

Speaker
Biography:

Dr.-Ing. Peter Burggräf was born in 1980 in Remscheid. He studied mechanical engineering at the RWTH Aachen University with focus on production engineering. Furthermore he studied at the Imperial College in London. From 2007 until 2011 he was a research assistant at the Chair for Production Engineering of the Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering (WZL) of RWTH Aachen University. His research focus includes factory planning, organizational design and the digital factory. Consultancy topics include business processes and ERP systems, development and implementation of production systems, factory planning as well as overall Lean advisory and Lean trainings. Since 2011 Dr. Burggräf has been head of the Production Management department.

Abstract:

Production infrastructure is built for decades, however the requirements change with increasing time. During the next 20 years, the world will change as much as it has changed in the past 100 years. This development will change the production and the factory of the future. From market perspective the needs of society have been fundamentally changed. What we find today is a maslow hierarchy which has been turned around during the last decade. New trends influence peoples’ life style. Several new trends lead to a marginalization of the production sector. The importance of production competence is decreasing and the effect of commoditization and marginalization of production will increase in the future. The ability to generate profits in production is in danger. In order to escape from the vicious circle, the factory and production planning has to be revolutionized. A new factory framework is required and a new, agil engineering process is needed to strengthen the future production. To answer the question: “What does our production signify?” a clear and comprehensive vision of the factory of the future is required. To face all these challenges a disruptive approach has been developed and implemented during the last years and will be shown by several examples.

  • Materials Science
Speaker

Chair

Jana Sobotov

Czech Technical University, Czech Republic

Speaker

Co-Chair

Adel Nofal

CMRDI Cairo, Egypt

Session Introduction

Jana Sobotová

Czech Technical University, Czech Republic

Title: Effect of sub-zero treatment on the wear resistance of P/M tool steels

Time : 12:20-12:45

Speaker
Biography:

Deputy Head of Department and in tutor fields of Production and Economics in Engineering and Manufacturing and Materials Engineering, conference organizer Student creative activities at CTU, teaching (FS, MIAS), supervision of diploma and bachelor theses, scientific and research activities in the field heat treatment of metals.

Abstract:

Sub-zero treatment of tool steels is classified in the cycle of conventional heat treatment. This kind of heat treatment has been reported to improve wear resistance of tools. This improvement is not seen in the same way for all materials and except the material depends on a number of the other factors. This study follows the previous works, in which the effect of sub-zero treatment on the mechanical and structural properties of PM tool steels was solved. Two types of P/M tool steels were austenitized, nitrogen gas quenched and double tempered. Sub-zero period, made at different conditions, was also inserted between quenching and tempering. There were used cold work steel Vanadis 6 and high speed steels Vanadis 30 for the research. Wear evaluation was carried out by pin-on-disk. The observed values of wear resistance have been compared with the values of hardness and the bending strength.

Marcin Górny

AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland

Title: Primary grains and eutectic cells in thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings

Time : 12:45-13:10

Speaker
Biography:

Marcin Górny, Ph.D. D. Sc. Eng., Associate Professor employed at the Faculty of Foundry Engineering, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland. Author of over a hundred papers and the monography. His research activities are focused in the following areas: Cast irons; Cast composites, Solidification of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys; Thin wall castings. As a Principal investigator he leaded two research projects respecting innovative thin-walled ductile and compacted graphite cast iron technology. In 2012 his research activity was awarded by the Institute of Cast Metals Engineers in the form of the British Foundry Medal.

Abstract:

This research looks into the most important quality parameters in cast iron, namely the primary grains and eutectic cells in thin walled castings. The primary grains and eutectic cells morphology and count are quality factors reflecting the physicochemical state of liquid cast iron at a given cooling rate. The excellent property combination of thin wall ductile iron (SGI) and compacted graphite iron castings, including thin wall austempered and alloyed iron (eg. ferritic and austenitic SGI) has opened new horizons for cast iron to replace steel castings and forgings in many engineering applications with considerable cost benefits. SGI and CGI should therefore be considered as a potential material for the preparation of light castings with good mechanical and utility properties, the cost of which is relatively low. From the point of view of economics and ecology, thin wall iron castings can compete in terms of mechanical properties with the "light" castings made of aluminum alloy. In the present work, the effect of time spent from spheroidization/vermicularization and inoculation processes on shaping the primary and eutectic structure in thin wall ductile (SGI) and compacted graphite iron (CGI) castings has been shown. A thermal analysis was performed to determine the maximum undercooling at the beginning of the solidification whereas metallographic examinations were carried out to reveal macro and microstructure characteristics during primary and eutectic solidification of cast iron. This work shows that the melt quality can be linked to morphology and number of austenite dendrites (primary grains), graphite and matrix structure (including mechanical properties).

Break: Lunch Break @Esperanto I +II 13:10-13:55
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Adel Nofal is the Professor of metal casting and former president of Central Metallurgical R&D Institute. He is working as a Head of the World Foundry Organization (WFO) technical committee ADI, Member of the European Cast Iron Group (ECIG) as one of two non-European scientists worldwide. He was honoured with State merit award of advanced technological sciences (2010), and award of scientific excellence from the Egyptian Academy for Scientific and Research Technology (2002) He is Author of about 150 scientific publications. He is the Chairman of The Egyptian International Symposium on Science and Processing of Cast Iron (SPCI-9) – Luxor – Egypt and President of Egyptian Foundry men Society.

Abstract:

This review is an attempt to compile the results of the worldwide explosion of research and development that followed the announcement of the first production of this material, meanwhile, reference is made to the work carried at Central Metallurgical R&D Institute (CMRDI) over the past decade. Better understanding of the strengthening mechanisms of ADI has led to the development of a new technique that contribute to enhance strength and toughness of the alloy, some examples will be discussed in details such as:- ausformed ADI; squeeze cast ADI, two step ADI, and nano-structured ADI. The excellent abrasion resistance of ADI could still be remarkably increased through the development of; carbidic ADI, bainitic/martensitic (B/M) ADI, selective surface treatment. The review analyses of the key feature of important processing techniques of ADI such as: cold rolling, welding, and machining was done. A novel development of ADI is the intercritically austempered ductile iron; an exciting engineering material with a favorable combination of good strength and ductility, excellent fatigue strength and good machinability resulting from a microstructure containing colonies of proeutectoid ferrite together with isolated island of austenite.

Xianhui Wang

Xi’an University of Technology, China

Title: Influence of TiB2 and SnO2 powders on arc erosion behaviors of Ag base contact materials

Time : 14:45-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Xianhui Wang is a Professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi'an University of Technology. He is currently working in the Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Electrical Materials and Infiltration Technology in the Xi’an University of Technology, China.

Abstract:

To clarify the influence of the material characteristics of strengthening phase on the arc erosion behaviors of Ag base contact materials, Ag-8wt% TiB2 and Ag-8wt% SnO2 contact materials were fabricated by powder metallurgy. The microstructure was characterized, and the relative density, hardness and electrical conductivity were measured. The arc erosion of Ag-8wt% TiB2and Ag-8wt% SnO2 contact materials was tested, the breakdown strength, arc duration and mass loss before and after arc erosion were determined, the surface morphologies and compositions after arc erosion were characterized, and the arc erosion mechanism of Ag base contact materials was discussed as well. The results show that TiB2 powders have better strengthening effect than SnO2 powders for Ag base contact materials. Compared with the Ag-8wt%SnO2 contact material, Ag-8wt%TiB2 contact material exhibits higher hardness, electrical conductivity and arc erosion resistance. After arc erosion 50 times, Ag-8wt%TiB2 contact material presents higher breakdown strength, shorter average arc duration, less mass loss, larger erosion area and shallower pits, and more homogeneous surface composition.

Zhang Min

Xi’an University of Technology, China

Title: Numerical simulation on microstructure of ultralow carbon bainit in welding molten pool

Time : 15:10-15:55

Speaker
Biography:

Zhang Min is a Professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi'an University of Technology. He is currently working in the Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Electrical Materials and Infiltration Technology in the Xi’an University of Technology, China

Abstract:

A new model for the microstructure of ultralow carbon bainite in welding molten pool during solidification process was developed, which was based on cellular automation method and realized the separation of solid solute concentration and liquid solute concentration. The single dendrite and multi-dendrite with different crystallographic orientations and columnar-to-equiaxed transition were simulated. The influence of different undercoolings on the morphology of dendrites was considered. The results indicate that the growth rate becomes faster and the microsegregation is more serious when the undercooling increases, while the needed time is shorter. At the same time, the crystallographic orientations affect the dendrite morphology, especially the growth of the secondary and tertiary dendrite trunks

Break: Coffee Break @Main Lobby 15:55-16:10

Adel Nofal

Central Metallurgical R&D Institute (CMRDI) Cairo, Egypt

Title: Thermo-mechanically Processed austempered Ductile Iron

Time : 16:10-16:35

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Adel Nofal is the Professor of metal casting and former president of Central Metallurgical R&D Institute. He is working as a Head of the World Foundry Organization (WFO) technical committee ADI, Member of the European Cast Iron Group (ECIG) as one of two non-European scientists worldwide. He was honoured with State merit award of advanced technological sciences (2010), and award of scientific excellence from the Egyptian Academy for Scientific and Research Technology (2002) He is Author of about 150 scientific publications. He is the Chairman of The Egyptian International Symposium on Science and Processing of Cast Iron (SPCI-9) – Luxor – Egypt and President of Egyptian Foundry men Society.

Abstract:

Thermo-mechanical processing as a method of strength improvement of ductile irons (DI) recently attracts research and industrial interest. Thermo-mechanical processing refines the as-cast structures, closes up the internal shrinkage cavities and gas porosity, and is able to reduce the segregations of alloying elements. Additionally, it increases the dimensional accuracy and improves surface finish of the products finally reducing the manufacturing costs. This work highlights the transformation kinetics, microstructure evolution, mechanical behaviour of thermo-mechanically processed ductile irons. In the framework of this study, ductile irons (DIs) with different aluminum, silicon, manganese and copper levels are investigated. The DIs are subjected to different total values of true strain of 0, 0.3 and 0.5. Additionally, two types of matrices were produced, namely ausferritic and ausferritic-ferritic matrices. The introduction of ferrite to the matrix to produce dual matrix (DM) DI is accomplished by two different methods, which are: the isothermal holding in the intercritical temperature range after austenitization and the direct heating to this temperature range. It is observed that increasing the aluminum widened the intercritical region and shifted it to a higher temperature range. The former effect rendered the intercritical annealing more controllable. The latter effect is also observed as a consequence of increasing the silicon level. Thus, increasing the aluminum- and silicon-levels in DI resulted in increasing the intercritical annealing temperature range and consequently increasing in the carbon saturating the intercritical austenite. This carbon increase substantially enhanced the strength and hardness of DI with dual matrix structure. The microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of the DI with DM are mainly governed by the chemistry of the intercritical austenite. On the other hand, the manganese increase to 0.7 wt% yielded a reduced rate of ausferrite transformation simultaneously; significant higher volume percentage of untransformed austenite was retained on the expense of the strong ausferrite, which lowered the strength and ductility. Thus, manganese is not beneficial for the ausferritic and ausferritic-ferritic DI. The copper addition to the DI in a level of 0.8 wt% enhanced both of the graphite nodularity and the nodule count and resulted in improving the strength and ductility of the produced DI. The generated ferrite by isothermal holding in the intercritical region after austenitization (ferrite is formed from austenite) is clustered around the graphite nodules, whereas that generated by heating and holding in the intercritical region (austenite is formed from ferrite/pearlite) is well distributed in the matrix. The latter microstructure showed superior strength, ductility to the former one.

  • Young Researchers Forum

Session Introduction

Lucas Hof

Concordia University, Canada

Title: Microstructuring of glass by Spark Assisted Chemical Engraving (SACE)

Time : 16:35-16:45

Biography:

L A Hof, MSc is pursuing his Doctoral research in Mechanical Engineering at Concordia University, Canada, on nanoparticle imprinting on glass substrates by Spark Assisted Chemical Engraving. He obtained his Master (with Honours) and Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering, Advanced Mechatronics, in 2004 from Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, and did his Master research on 3D micro-structuring of glass at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland. He is winner of several awards including the prestigious doctoral Quebec Merit FQRNT award, was nominated for the Vanier CGS and wrote more than 15 journal and conference papers. His research interests include: micro-/nano systems and advanced manufacturing processes

Abstract:

Glass is used in industry and academia for fabrication of MEMS devices and microfluidics. This is mainly because of its unique properties, like mechanical strength, thermal properties, transparency, and chemically inertness. However, the hardness and brittleness of glass complicates its micro-fabrication. In particular machining high-aspect ratio structures is still challenging due to long machining times, high machining costs and poor resulting surface quality. Micro-machining methods for glass machining can be divided into three groups: thermal, chemical, and mechanical. Thermal processes like laser are fast and flexible but form usually bulges around the rims of the hole entrances leading to bonding difficulties and often making post process steps necessary. Chemical processes produce smooth surfaces but require expensive masks (low process flexibility) while mechanical methods are relatively slow and result in poor surface roughness. Hybrid technologies like spark assisted chemical engraving (SACE) are advantageous as they endeavor to combine the good outcomes of each process to satisfy most requirements for the desired micro-structures in glass. In SACE technology an electrochemical process heats a tool-electrode which promotes local etching of the glass substrate. In this paper, we present the state-of-the-art of SACE technology, as implemented in an industrial machine together with Posalux SA. The developed technology allows in particular the machining of deep and high aspect ratio structures in glass, manufacturing crack- and burr-free surfaces. The implementation of a force-sensitive machining head allows the use of ultra-thin machining tools, applying force-feedback algorithms and using the head as profilometer to measure machined features.

Gabriela Sikora

AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland

Title: Fading of the grain refinemnet effects in Al-Cu alloys

Time : 16:45-16:55

Biography:

Gabriela Sikora has completed her full-time studies from AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland. She obtained a Master's degree on the Faculty of Foundry Engineering. Currently she is the PhD student at the AGH University of Science and Technology where she deals with the solidification and structure formation of aluminum-copper alloys.

Abstract:

Grain refinement of aluminium alloys is common industrial practice. Many researchers have extensively investigated this field over the past 50 years, not only to develop efficient grain refiners for different aluminium alloys, but also to achieve an understanding of the mechanism of grain refinement. The present research was been conducted on thin-walled castings with 5mm wall thicknesses. In this work an influence of three different master alloys was investigated, namely: (1) Al-5% Ti-1%B, (2) Al-5%Ti and (3) Al-3%B, respectively on the structure and the degree of under-cooling (ΔTα = Tα-Tmin, where Tα - the equilibrium solidification temperature, Tmin - the minimum temperature at the beginning of α (Al) solidification) of an Al-Cu alloy. The roles of the fading have been investigated at different time spent on refinement treatment i.e., from, 3, 20, 45 and 90 minutes, respectively from adding master alloys. Thermal analysis was performed to determine the real cooling rate and solidification parameters, eg., degree of under-cooling, recalescence, etc, whereas metallographic examination was conducted for macro and micro-structure characteristic. It can be concluded that the fading effects of refinement of the primary structure is accompanied by a significant change of number (dimension) of primary grains, which can be correlated with solidification parameters, determined based on thermal analysis. Finally, its shown that the refining process of primary structure is unstable and requires strict metallurgical control.

Biography:

Javaid Butt is currently pursuing his PhD from Anglia Ruskin University in the field of Additive Manufacturing. He has published 2 research papers in reputed journals and presented 2 research papers at international conferences. He has won best presentation and best poster awards at a number of intra-university conferences.

Abstract:

This paper presents an experimental and numerical analysis of the effect of heat on the tensile properties of layered aluminium 1050 metal foil parts made by a new additive manufacturing process known as composite metal foil manufacturing. A brief introduction of the process has been presented alongside a depiction of the different steps involved in product development. The process is a mix of overlaid item fabrication and brazing methods. It has indicated great promise by diminishing the constraints identified with customary machining strategies including cost, speed, material determinations and more. It can deliver high quality metal and composite parts without the utilization of additional hardware or apparatus. In this paper, a three dimensional finite element model has been developed to contemplate the effect of heat on the tensile properties of 200 micron thick aluminium 1050 metal foils. The effect of thermal stress and strain has been analyzed by carrying out transient thermal analysis on the heated plates used to join the nine 200 micron thick metal foils using a special brazing paste. A standard tensile test at ambient temperature has been carried out on the resulting layered dog-bone specimen to analyze the effect of heat on the individual layers of metal. The investigations have been precisely designed to assess the effect of heat provided amid the brazing operation to join the metal thwarts together as a layered structure and regardless of whether it assumes a part in affecting the tensile properties of the final product when contrasted with solid aluminium 1050 dog-bone specimen of the same measurements

Fatma Kria

National School of Engineers of Sfax, Tunisia

Title: Thermal behaviour of RHCM mold with different heating/cooling channel designs

Time : 17:05-17:15

Speaker
Biography:

Fatma Kria has obtained her Engineering Diploma in 2008 and Master's degree in Materials and Surfaces (2012). Currently, she is a PhD Student at the unit of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Transfer Phenomena in the Department of Mechanics at the National Engineering School of Sfax, Tunisia under the supervision of Prof. Mounir Baccar and Prof. Moez Hammami. She has published two papers in international journals and have participated in four international conferences. She is a Contractual Assistant at the Preparatory Institute of Engineer of Monastir, Tunisia. Also, she has taught courses at the National Engineering School of Sfax, Tunisia.

Abstract:

Rapid Heat Cycle Molding (RHCM) is a thermoplastic injection molding process which was recently developed. The principle of this technology consists a rapid heating of the mold till the glass transition temperature of the polymer Tg, and then, injecting the melting polymer into the mold cavity. At this level, the cooling stage begins and continues until cooling down the polymer to a temperature permitting the ejection of the finished product without any deformation. After ejection, the mold is heated again and the next RHCM cycle begins. To succeed an RHCM process, we must guarantee both goals: firstly, the heating/cooling rapidity ensuring high process productivity and; secondly, temperature uniformity at the cavity surface providing good products quality. This study is focused on the thermal control system of RHCM mold producing complex shaped automotive part. To achieve our objectives, numerical simulations of heat transfer in cavity/core plates, polymer and coolant through some RHCM cycle have been undertaken to obtain the cyclic "steady-state". Gambit 2.3.16 has been used to produce the gird for the CFD solver. The commercial software Fluent 6.3.26, which is based on a finite volume method, has been used. Several arrangements of heating/cooling channels have been proposed and compared. The limitation of a classic conformal design has been demonstrated and the importance of an original conformal design has been proved. In fact, with this design, we could greatly reduce the cycle time, temperature gap and energy consumption. Also, in this work, we have provided in evidence the importance of the cooling thermal behavior (contrary to the hypothesis of a constant cooling temperature used in the previous reserchs) to grantuate the precision of the predicted RHCM cycle.

Biography:

Le Van Dinh has completed his Master's degree from Moscow Power Engineering Institute. Currently, he is a graduate student under Prof. Pikina Galina Alekseevna in Moscow Power Engineering Institute, Russia. He has published more than 5 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The dynamic models with, dissipation with temperature reactivity coefficient for reactor type WWER are developed here. Unlike conventional engineering models with concentrated parameters and one group of delayed neutrons, in the work takes into account: the fluid and heat flow parameters distribution of the active zone height, six groups of delayed neutrons, the impact on the processes of inactive metal, and water volumes below and above the active area. The transfer functions across all major channels are obtained.

Biography:

Ayden Torkabadi is a PhD candidate at Industrial Systems Engineering department at the University of Regina. He is focusing on the application of Artifitial Neural Networks on development of intelligent production control policies. He previously completed his MBA in Malaysia University of Technolog where he was focusing on production managment. He has a BSc in Industrial Engineering from Iran University Science and Technology.

Abstract:

Achieving the minimum manufacturing costs level is of great importance for organizations to improve the operation margin. Just In-Time (JIT) manufacturing is practiced by many organizations to attain that objective. Reserving minimum Work-In-Process (WIP) through pull production control systems is targeted by JIT systems. This research compares the performance of Kanban, CONWIP and seven proposed hybrid production control systems besides presenting a review on literature in the area. Accordingly, the methods, results and specifications of the production systems of previous researches are discussed in the review. This research considers a multi- level production and assembly line that manufactures multi products. The case selected for the manufacturing model is from auto part industry. The output values for the WIP and other performance measures are achieved by using discrete event computer simulation. Findings from performance comparison of Kanban, CONWIP and proposed hybrid systems are presented.

Biography:

Cannas Violetta Giada is PhD candidate at School of Management of Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) from November 2015. Additionally, she supports teaching activities on the course of “Business Processes Reengineering” at POLIMI. In July 2014, she obtained her MSc with honors in Management Engineering from “LIUC – Università Cattaneo” in Castellanza (Varese), Italy, with a specialization in “Lean Manufacturing”. Her main research interests are associated with production planning, and supply chain design and management.

Abstract:

Nowadays, Engineer to order (ETO) companies have to match request for customization with shorter and shorter delivery lead times, with the consequent need to optimize the flexibility-efficiency trade-off. Therefore, this study aims at investigating how this problem has been addressed in literature and what are the existing open issues. According to literature, the ETO concept is often related to the position of the customer order decoupling point (CODP): The order entry point that starts the customer order driven activities. ETO corresponds to the CODP configuration where both non-physical and physical activities have to be performed after the arrival of the customer order, either defining a completely new product from scratch or adapting an existing design to the customer requirements. Hence, the engineering activities represent core competences. Nevertheless, the traditional view of the CODP does not consider different customization levels in the engineering phase. Thus, Rudberg and Wikner (2004) emphasize the impact of the customer order in both engineering and production dimensions through a two-dimensional CODP. This was the first work that underlines the necessity of a two dimensional perspective. Yet, there is still a lack of contributions in literature related to this area. Subsequently, this paper suggests future research directions, by defining a framework to support the study of the main implications and incentives of the two dimensional CODP positioning in ETO companies to optimize the flexibility-efficiency trade-off.

Biography:

Hamza Alsalla has got a high diploma in renewable energy and mechanical engineering from the academy of graduate studies, Libya and he has received his master degree in Aerospace materials from Sheffield University, department of material science and engineering, United Kingdom since 2012. Also he has started his PhD since September 2013 at the University of Exeter, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Science. He is a lecture in the Technology College of Civil Aviation and Meteorology, Sbeah-Libya and Demonstrate Tutorial in mechanics at Exeter University. He is Ex-lecture in Alzzaytouna University –Libya. His research interests are in aerospace material (lightweight), fracture mechanics and mechanical engineering.

Abstract:

Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process is a metallic additive manufacturing technique that directly manufactures strong, lightweight and complex three dimensional parts in a layer-by-layer to scan and melt the metal powder for aerospace applications. However, there are still certain evaluation criteria such as fracture toughness and tensility of cellular structure made by SLM which were not reported before. This study presents new and novel methods in additive manufacturing and evaluates the local failure mechanism of 316L cellular lattice structures made by SLM under uniaxial tension and three point pending load. The effect of different build directions of the 316L lattice structure on the fracture toughness properties are compared to the Ashby and Gibson models. Also, the effect of different build directions on tensile properties of 316L cellular structures has been investigated. Microcomputer tomography (CT) reveals that the cellular structure parts with different build directions were manufactured free of defect by the SLM. The relative density of solid struts is revealed. The tensile and fracture toughness properties in vertical building direction samples and in horizontal building direction were addressed. There was no big difference between the Ashby and Gibson micromechanical model to predict fracture toughness.