Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Design and Production Engineering Berlin,Germany.

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Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Petter Øyan

Oslo and Akershus University, Norway

Keynote: The value of user focused design, exemplified through a collaborative process for developing learning arenas

Time : 09:00AM to 09:30AM

OMICS International Design and Production 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Petter Øyan photo
Biography:

Petter Øyan, professor of industrial design. Graduated from Hochschule für Gestaltung, Schwäbisch Gmünd, Germany 1981. More than 20 years of international, professional design experience as freelance design consultant and partner in a product design consultancy. Broad portfolio of product development projects, ranging from office workspaces to laboratory instruments, and from international enterprises to technology start-ups.

Abstract:

Industrial Design uses a wide range of tools and processes to explore and identify the behaviour, needs and wishes of the users of products and systems, and based on analysis of this information develop innovative solutions and products. Fast technological and societal development leads to faster changes in the development of workspaces and learning arenas. Working life and education becomes more global and consequently more competitive, or even collaborative. It is therefore necessary to understand the “user group” our students represent, and the work practices they bring with them from earlier education as well as the expectations they have for their future working world. Digital workspaces make a good case for experimenting with design processes. To get relevant information to feed into the development of our learning facilities, we have set up a series of projects where students in the role of designers are coached through a collaborative design process involving students, teachers and the university administration, as well as suppliers of technology and equipment. There are several models for the over-all design process as well as for the different phases of a project, suitable tools must be chosen according to the assignment, the framework and the task. The concepts and recommendations are lifted into our real development process, analysed and tested by prototyping, to give feedback on the quality of user interaction with objects and systems, physically and emotionally. I will present this process and analyse the value for our facility development.

Keynote Forum

Rainer Gadow

University of Stuttgart, Germany

Keynote: Manufacturing engineering in thermal spray technologies by advanced robot systems and process kinematics

Time : 9.30AM - 10.00AM

OMICS International Design and Production 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rainer Gadow photo
Biography:

Prof. Gadow has completed his M.Sc. and PhD both in chemistry at the University of Karlsruhe (T. H.), Germany, now KIT. As assistant professor he was head of the ceramics and composites group at ICT, University of Karlsruhe. In his industrial career he was head R&D and general manager in world leading companies in technical ceramics, surface technologies and advanced mechanical engineering. Since 1995 he is full professor and managing diretor of IFKB, the institute of manufacturing technologies of ceramic components and composites at the University of Stuttgart, Germany. He managed various national and international projects in advanced cermics, surface and nano technologies. He is the acting dean of the faculty of mechanical, automotive and production engineering with 17 research institutes in Stuttgart. Furthermore he is managing director of New Materials Technologies at TTI GmbH, Stuttgart. He has published more than 700 papers in reviewed journals and more than 60 patents in the field of product development with new materials and manufacturing processes. He is serving as an editorial board member and peer reviewer of various scientific journals and visiting professor worldwide.

Abstract:

Plasma physics and material science have dominated academic research in thermal spray technologies in recent decades. Value adding by creation and manufacturing of competitive products with advanced coating technologies employed needs a state of the art approach in manufacturing engineering. Thinking in process chains and managing all steps of them with a focus on product performance, reliability and customer satisfaction is an indispensable methodology for modern manufacturing engineering with complex high technologies. Materials mechanics and the understanding of process induced residual stresses and their interaction with operational load stresses are further issues in product development of coatings and layer composite structures. Intensive heat and mass transfer up to supersonic conditions have a distinct influence on coating properties. The same is true for the torch trajectories and robot kinematics programming with their influence on local resolution of these parameters and subsequently on the achievable dimensional tolerances and reproducibility in industrial processes.rnFor high process reproducibility and optimized coating quality in thermal spray applications on complex geometries, APS (Atmospheric Plasma Spraying), HVOF (High Velocity Oxygen Fuel) and further torches are guided by advanced robot systems. The trajectory of the torch, the spray angle and the relative speed between torch and component are crucial factors which affect the coating microstructure and phase composition as well as the mechanical, thermophysical and electrophysical properties and especially the residual stress distribution. Thus the requirement of high performance thermally sprayed coatings with narrow dimensional tolerances leads to challenges in the field of robot assisted handling, and software tools for efficient trajectory generation and robot programming are demanded. By appropriate data exchange, the automatically generated torch trajectory and speed profile can be integrated in FEM (Finite Element Method) models in order to analyze their influence on the heat and mass transfer during deposition.rnLast not least the process variants have to be matched to meet the best fit of functional requirements of the coating product in its specific application field. Modeling and simulation concepts are shown to demonstrate their potential and benefit for industrial product development. Case studies are introduced in the fields of new combustion engines, ship propulsion and nuclear power plant engineering.

  • Production Engineering & Management | Interactive Aerospace | Metrology and Inspection
Speaker

Chair

Adriana Arineli

International Iberoamerican University, Mexico

Speaker

Co-Chair

Drezet Jean-Marie

Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne, Switzerland

Session Introduction

Anna Runnemalm

University West, Sweden

Title: Automatic inspection of surface cracks in welded components
Speaker
Biography:

Anna Runnemalm has a PhD degree in Experimental Mechanics from Luleå University of Technology, Sweden, and experience from optical measuring techniques. She has a position as Assistant Professor in Experimental Mechanics at University West, Sweden, and is the coordinator of non-destructive testing activities at the Production Technology Centre in Trollhättan. Her research focuses on automatic inspection in general and specially on automatic nondestructive testing of welded joints. She is author and co-author of more than 20 paper published in international journals and conferences.

Abstract:

The automotive and aeronautic industries are today aiming for lighter structures in order to fulfill environmental requirements. With the goal to reduce weight the margin of safety might be reduced, then the quality control become more important and the interest of automatic inspection has therefore increased. It is obvious that general inspection and an automatic result of the quality of each and every product are competitive. An automatic inspection cell consists of a measuring device, a mechanized system for scanning, software for automatic analysis of the acquired data, and also a system for automatic reporting and feed-back of the results. Different non-destructive testing (NDT) systems have been evaluated as possible measuring techniques in an automatic inspection cell. For inspection of surface cracks in welds, infrared thermography has proven to be suitable. Since the method is non-contact and full field, several automation problems are obviated. Another advantage is that the methods do not need any pre-treatment of the surface. Results show that surface cracks less than 25 µm in width are detectable. Surface cracks both in the weld area and in the heat affected zone are detected. In addition, the output from the thermography system can be used for control of the scanning, weld joint tracking. This makes the automation cell more flexible and minimizes the need of different measuring sensors.

Break: Coffee Break @ Main Lobby 10:25-10:40
Speaker
Biography:

Adriana Arineli is director of Experiência Consultoria. Consultant with extensive experience in consultant projects and strategic programs. She is doctoral student in Project and Business Management at Universidad Internacional Iberoamericana. M.S c in Management Systems, MBA in Organizations and Strategy, MBA in Quality with emphasis in Business Management, all at Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF) with international extensions in Italy (Università di Padova) and Germany (Universität Tübingen and Hochschule Reutlingen. Invited professor at FGV since 2008, regularly teaches in several post graduate courses and MBA's of the institution and also at ESPM andIBMEC universities.

Abstract:

Dealing with intangible and so subtle experience, is unusual and a huge challenge for management that is not used to measure what has no numbers and maybe need to see beyond the obvious and accessible statistics. Recently, several studies point to the importance of CEM (Customer Experience Management). However, if the CEM is a strategy to focus at operations and processes of a business around the experiences of the customers to the company, it is essential to seek grants to structure it and find out their effectiveness. This study examines the issues involved in offering superior customer experiences. Through research it was possible to analyze the aspects that impact on productivity and perceived quality. It can be concluded, that CEM can be used as a guideline matrix management in decision making to promote superior customer experiences. Even assuming that it is defiant see beyond the obvious, maybe this is the necessary opportunity, to create real competitive advantage and longevity for companies that want to stand out and be successful over time.

Jihong Hwang

Seoul National University of Science and Technology, South Korea

Title: Perceived emotion induced by a surface with random roughness
Speaker
Biography:

Jihong Hwang is an associate professor in Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, South Korea. He got his PhD degree in industrial engineering at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA in 2005. He received masters’ and bachelor’s degrees in Mechanical Design and Production Engineering from Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea. His research interests are in the areas of haptic design, affective design and human-machine interaction.

Abstract:

This study investigated the type of emotions induced by a surface which has a random pattern with different roughness In a product design, the surface finish plays an important role for building the first impressions since even the same material can generate different look and feel depending on the surface patterns. Considering that the first impression is highly dependent of the effective processing of the perceived information, it is meaningful to quantify the effect of surface patterns on the emotions. However, the emotions induced by a tactile interaction with the surface were not thoroughly revealed yet. In this study, the perceived emotions induced by a surface with a random pattern were empirically collected and classified. In order to simulate a natural surface, test specimens have random patterns which were fabricated by a 3D printing machine. Five voluntary participants recruited from a university tested the specimen. The participants blindly touched the test specimen and rated the invoked emotions by a questionnaire. The questionnaire items were adjectives representing tactile feelings which were collected from the literature and refined for the experiment; warm, cold, slippery, sticky, smooth, rough, hard, soft, uneven, flat, coarse, fine, dimply, grainy, sparse, slick. The result showed a close relationship between the roughness and some emotional items. The findings of this study can help designers choosing a roughness level to induce a predetermined emotion. By providing a quantifiable guideline relating the emotions and physical properties, it could support designers’ decision making processes for a product design.

Drezet Jean-Marie

Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland

Title: Quench induced stresses considering precipitation in industrial aluminum pieces
Speaker
Biography:

J M Drezet has completed his PhD from Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland. In 1996, he started to conduct two European Research Projects (Empact and Vircast) dedicated to aluminum continuous casting and product quality. His fields of research et are computations and measurements of internal stresses, solidification and precipitation in aluminum alloys and study of stress related casting defects such as hot tearing. From 2009, he started to use neutron diffraction to measure internal stresses in as-cast industrial aluminum billets and large ingots. In 2011, he used in situ neutron diffraction during casting to determine the rigidity temperature of solidifying aluminum alloys. He is MER Professor in Materials Science at EPFL where he teaches Continuum Mechanics, Metals and Alloys and Metals for Civil Engineering.

Abstract:

When processing heat treatable aluminium alloys, quenching is a key step. It consists in cooling the component to room temperature as quickly as possible to obtain a non-equilibrium solid solution. Quenching should be fast in order to avoid or limit precipitation. However, high thermal gradients through the thickness of the component cause non-homogeneous plastic strain resulting in residual stresses after quenching. In this paper, two approaches are presented to predict the as-quenched residual stress distribution in large 2xxx forgings and thick 7xxx aluminium alloy plates. The first approach consists in characterising the precipitation that occurs during quenching, e.g. using in situ small angle X-ray scattering, and modelling its impact on the yield strength and thus on the internal stress generation. The second approach is based on a thermo-mechanical model whose parameters are identified using a limited number of tensile tests achieved after representative interrupted cooling paths in a Gleeble machine. As quenched stresses measured ex situ using the neutron diffraction technique are compared with the modelling results and each approach is assessed.

Speaker
Biography:

Tetsuya Morimoto is an associate fellow at Aeronautical Technology Directorate at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). He holds a Dr. of Engineering degree from the University of Tokyo.

Abstract:

An asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) cellular automaton (CA) model – a ‘bucket brigade’ model – was implemented for production lines of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) airframes. Aerospace CFRPs have limited shelf life to put minimal buffer periods for each step to approach a lean production in the way of time discrete ASEP CA model. ASEP CA model is known to reduce throughput drastically if 1) excessive density of inventories surpasses stagnation point, and 2) steps are not harmonized, therefore, even by far improvement rate at a step can negate the whole inventories throughout the production line. Using the model, we conduct a case study for Boeing 787 production line in Japan and USA, and our results suggest that reduced inventory input could have enhanced the apparent delivery rate up to the target, 16 units delivery per month, drastically earlier than the reality. We then estimate future trend of production rate for an imaginary airframe to find that modulating production rate is difficult for CFRP component line as if it were the bucket brigade of the ‘Sorcerer’s Apprentice.’

Speaker
Biography:

Omar S Es-Said is a Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Loyola Marymount University in LA, California. He was a full Professor from 1998 to present. He received his PhD in Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science from the University of Kentucky, Lexington in 1985. His current research interests include metallic processing and modeling. He published over 300 papers. He has been an Associate Editor from 2008 to present for the Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance. He received several grants and awards for research funds for a total of over $3.6 million. He was a consultant for the Navy from 1994-2015 and a fellow of the American Society of Materials in 2005.

Abstract:

Three experiments were performed on the effect of hydrogen charging on the charpy impact toughness of 4340 steel. In the first experiment 4340 steel plates were austentized and tempered to give the following target tensile strength values of: 1000, 1102, 1170, 1240, 1310, 1410, 1515, and 1720 MPa. Charpy impact samples were tempered at each of these temperatures. These samples were separated into uncharged and hydrogen charged samples. The charged samples were then plated with 0.0076 to 0.013 mm thickness layer of cadmium. It was found that samples tempered above 468°C and subjected to hydrogen charging exhibited lower impact energy values when compared to un-charged samples. No significant difference between charged and un-charged samples tempered below 468°C was observed. In a second experiment steel plates were Electro Discharge Machined into twenty-four compact tension fracture toughness bars. These samples were divided into four groups: as-received, tempered, cadmium coated, and cadmium coated and tempered. The cadmium coating was 0.013 mm in thickness. The tempering temperatures were 354°C, 468°C, and 621°C, for two hours. Also, charpy impact samples were treated in the same way. A correlation between the fracture toughness and Charpy Impact values was obtained. In a third experiment tempered 4340 steel was hydrogen charged by cadmium plating of 0.005 mm, 0.0076 mm, and 0.013 mm. It was found that charpy impact energy was highest for the 0.005 mm and lowest for the 0.013 mm across all strength values. The results can be explained by the model of (hydrogen) atmospheres associated with mobile dislocations.

Speaker
Biography:

Ramoshweu Solomon Lebelo is a Researcher and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics at Vaal University of Technology, South Africa. He obtained Doctoral degree in Mechanical Engineering from Cape Peninsula University of Technology, South Africa. The areas of research are in the fields of fluid dynamics, computational mathematics and heat transfer systems. His publications are in international journals and peer-reviewed conference proceedings.

Abstract:

Spontaneous combustion in stockpiles of combustible materials is due to exothermic chemical reaction taking place within the system, where the trapped oxygen reacts automatically with the material containing hydrocarbons. The chemical reaction results with heat as one of the products. Should the rate of heat production exceed that of heat release to the ambient, the system’s temperature increases rapidly and may lead to thermal runaway that ultimately causes self-ignition. In this study, effects of kinetic parameters such as activation energy and rate of reaction on the temperature of the system are investigated. These parameters are embedded on the differential equation governing the problem. The combustion reaction results with complicated reaction mechanism that is nonlinear and as a result the nonlinear differential equation is tackled using numerical methods. Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method coupled with shooting technique is used to solve the equation with the help of Maple software.

Gang Hao

City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Title: Option contract design and supply chain coordination
Speaker
Biography:

Hao Gang has obtained her PhD from Katz Graduate School of Business at University of Pittsburgh, USA. She is an Associate Professor at College of Business, City University of Hong Kong. Her research interests cover supply chain optimization, revenue management, enterprise risk management, MCDM, and data science applications. She has been publishing in reputed academic journals, participated in a range of company consulting projects and teaching executive courses at all levels.

Abstract:

Option contract has been regarded as an effective approach to achieve supply chain coordination. Given its increasing adoption in industry, we developed an analytical framework and theoretical models to analyze impacts of options design and the optimal strategies of the parties. In consideration of risk attitudes of the chain parties, we further study coordination of a supply chain with options contract between a risk-neutral supplier that produces short-life cycle products and a loss-averse retailer facing with stochastic market demand. We study the optimal policies for the chain members and the coordination of the supply chain. Among a set of meaningful results, we find no pattern difference in order behavior between a loss-averse retailer and a risk-neutral retailer. We show that the optimal order quantity of a loss-averse retailer increases in retail price and decreases in option price and exercise price, which is different from the case of a risk-neutral retailer. We explore the supply chain coordination and prove existence of the Pareto contract in a coordinated supply chain setting.

Break: Lunch Break @ Esperanto I +II 13:10-13:40

Marquidia Pacheco

National Institute for Nuclear Research, Mexico

Title: A possibility for a cleaner transport: Non-thermal plasma technology
Speaker
Biography:

Marquidia Pacheco has a PhD on Physics and Enginerinng of Plasmas at the University Paul Sabatier, France. She actually works on environmental plasma applications (nanotubes based supercapacitors, syngas, automotive emissions) . She has published more than 43 papers in reputed journals, 2 chapters books, 3 patents, 125 congress, L’Oreal –UNESCO award: for Women in Science, Mexico.

Abstract:

It is widely known that the use of fossil fuel produces toxic gases emissions, like greenhouse gases and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Nevertheless, the impact of biofuels also has adverse health effects and a critical role in the tropospheric chemistry (i.e ozone precursor); it has been proved that their combustion could emit higher NOx concentrations, carbonyl compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, identified as toxic, mutagenic and/or carcinogenic. Therefore, is very important to study post combustion technologies; in this particular case a non thermal plasma reactor is proposed to treat several toxic emissions (NOx, sulfur dioxide, hydrocarbons and particulate matter). We will present experimental results obtained from the treatment of these products with non-thermal plasma. Several reactor configurations are here depicted, highlighting the importance of main experimental parameters; key radicals enabling better removal efficiencies have been elucidated from simple chemical models. Good removal efficiencies at low power input (<80W) are obtained, outlining the plasma as a feasible technology.

  • Manufacturing Process | Advanced Technology | Automation Development
Speaker

Chair

Jan-Gunnar Persson

Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm

Speaker

Co-Chair

Fernando Israel Gomez-Castro

Universidad de Guanajuato, Mexico

Session Introduction

Deniz Duran

Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany

Title: On the tailored forming of massive components: A hybrid shaft example
Speaker
Biography:

Deniz Duran has received his MS degree in manufacturing engineering in 2014 from Atilim University. He has been working as a scientific co-worker at Institute of Forming Technology and Machines of Leibniz University Hannover since 2015. His research interests mainly include modelling and experimentation of metal forming processes and manufacturing tribology.

Abstract:

Towards the challenge of promoting the resource efficiency, lightweight high performance components gain importance mainly in the automotive and aviation industry. However, the inevitable trade-off between strength and weight is a limiting factor in design and implementation. Load adapted tailored components with locally varying properties stands for a solution to this problem. In sheet forming industry, use of tailored blanks has increased notably in the last two decades, whereas utilisation of such concept is relatively new to bulk forming industry. At Leibniz Universität Hannover, Collaborative Research Centre (CRC1153) has been established to research possibilities for suitable process chains to manufacture massive hybrid components. The process chain involves manufacturing processes of joining, forming, heat treatment and machining. The interface between the two materials is referred to as joining zone whose characteristics are decisive in the performance of the manufactured component. In this study, processing of a bi-material hybrid shaft by tailored forming is covered. First of all, the process chain is given as an overview. In the following, strategies for the treatment of the joining zone by forming and approaches for induction heating of the semi-finished workpieces are discussed.

Jan-Gunnar Persson

Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm

Title: Current trends in product development
Speaker
Biography:

Jan-Gunnar Persson, professor emeritus, MSc Aeronautical Engineering, Licentiate of Engineering/ Mechanical Engineering, KTH. He spent 20 years in industry: 5 years consultancy for computer supported product design and production planning, 15 years with Atlas Copco AB in technology and business development, e.g. on turbo machinery, compressors and rock drilling equipment. He was appointed professor in Machine Design at KTH in 1988, with teaching and research in close co-operation with industry. Some of his areas of research are model driven product development, computer simulation, robotics, fluid machinery, thermal processes, and engineering design/industrial design integration. Publications: 80 papers and one text book.

Abstract:

Driving forces in product development (PD) and design are: Technology, Market and Society. Sustainability plays an increasingly important role in industrial PD; ecological, economic and social sustainability. The product life cycle, material recycling, reuse of components and energy conservation, has to be considered. Demand for customization is met by modular architecture. PD is a complex multi-dimensional process, integrating engineering design focusing on “hard” product properties, with industrial design focusing on “soft” product properties. A new type of designer is the design engineer, graduated within the field of industrial design engineering. Mechatronics represents another area of multidisciplinary products. The PD process is characterized by Innovation, Integration and Iteration. Integration refers to both technical integration i.e. multidisciplinary products, and organizational integration i.e. concurrent engineering (different disciplines participating in parallel). Iteration means loops in the PD process, significantly speeded up by the use of modeling and simulation software. Virtual prototyping is increasing. Systematic and structured PD is based on the first question “what” – i.e. functional requirements, followed by the “question “how” - i.e generation of design solution concepts. Analysis of couplings and interdependencies between subsystems and components, by Design Structure Matrices and Function-Means trees, is another important issue. The well-known V-model for specification and verification at different levels of detail is commonly used. The industrial PD and innovation process is often carried out as a 3-stage process, separating strategy, development of core technology, and product design for volume production and market introduction. Market analysis and business environment is another important issue in PD.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr M. Sowjanya obtained her PhD (Mechanical Engineering) from Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, India for her research in Planar Flow Melt Spinning Process. She has 12 years of teaching experience and presently working as Associate Professor. She has 10 papers to her credit and received ‘Excellent Paper Award' in International conference in Manufacturing and Optimization (ICMO) 2013, conducted by IACSIT at New Delhi, India. Her primary research areas of interest are Planar Flow Melt Spinning Process and heat transfer simulation and analysis of liquid/gas quenching of metals.She has also received 'Best Paper' award for her paper presented in International conference on Technological Innovations in Mechanical Engineering (TIME 2016), Hyderabad.

Abstract:

Amorphous ribbons employed for transformer core applications are manufactured by using planar flow melt spinning process. Molten metal, ejected by inert gas pressure on to a rotating cooling wheel through a constricted nozzle slit, accumulates as a puddle between the nozzle-wheel gap. A thin layer of melt is dragged in the form of a ribbon from the under cooled puddle. Critical process parameters are nozzle-slit width, wheel speed, nozzle-wheel gap, melt ejection pressure and temperature. The physical dimensions and metallurgical characteristics of the ribbon obtained depend highly on the fluid flow in the puddle and the heat transfer rate between the melt and the cooling wheel. High cooling rates and process speeds involved restrict the scope of experimental investigation of the above mentioned phenomena. Hence, numerical models are developed to predict the ribbon thickness, quality and heat dissipation in the cooling wheel. The results are supported by experimental investigation and found to be well in agreement. It is observed that the thickness and width of the ribbon is highly influenced by the wheel speed and nozzle-slit width. Amorphous structure is observed to be influenced by the heat transfer rate to the cooling wheel. Even though higher wheel speeds provide higher cooling rates at the melt-wheel contact, heat dissipation from the wheel to the cooling medium also observed to play an important role in obtaining a non-crystalline ribbon. It is suggested to use nozzles with larger slit width and spinning at higher wheel speeds to obtain thinner and wider ribbons.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Pikina G.A., doctor of technical sciences, professor of Russia National Research University “MPEI” Moscow. Author more than 150 publications, including text-books and two monograpfics. 45 years working in the university education. Filds of interests: modeling, optimal control, indentification, statistics.

Abstract:

Instead of the standard control principle on current state of control output it is offered to pass to the predictive control principle on future output. It is shown that realization of this principle in automatic control systems of technological parameters with standard algorithms (P, PI, PID) allows to increase significantly quality of regulation and at the same time more fully to use the opportunities given by programmable microprocessor equipment. The given in paper examples are proving that the forecast allows to reduce the range of control output deviation in one-circuit systems twice, and in double-circuit systems three times. Prediction can be used in coherent systems of regulation for the best approach of the real influence compensator to the ideal compensator. Potential opportunities of predictive algorithms can be used at setup of regulators on the operating object for cases when its dynamic characteristics are unknown. The method of setup of predictive linear regulators by one parameter forecast time is offered. Possibilities of such control are supported with results of modeling tests.

Break: Coffee Break @ Main Lobby 15:45-16:00
Speaker
Biography:

Fernando Israel Gomez-Castro has completed his PhD in Chemical Engineering from the Instituto Tecnológico de Celaya (Celaya Institute of Technology, Mexico). He is a full-time Professor and Director of a research team focusing on synthesis, design and optimization of chemical processes, particularly on conventional and intensified distillation schemes. He has published around 20 papers in reputed journals, 4 chapters and a book, also serving as reviewer for papers and research proposals. His biography has appeared at the 2015 editions of “Who’s Who in the World” and “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”.

Abstract:

In the chemical industry, or in refineries and biorefineries, it is common to find a reactor, or a set of reactors, where reactants are converted into valuable products and by-products. Those mixtures leaving the reaction section must be treated in a separation section to obtain the pure products, also recovering the unreacted raw materials. The design strategies for such systems have considerably changed with the years, varying from merely empirical methods, at the beginnings of production industry, to the modern computer-based methods, which imply the use of modular simulators. In this work, a brief history of the design methodologies for the separation processes will be presented; focusing on distillation columns, since they are the most used separation devices used in industry. The combination of modular simulators and a CFD approach is proposed to obtain reliable designs of distillation systems. Two cases of intensified distillation systems are presented as examples of the proposed approach, namely, a dividing wall distillation column and a reactive distillation column.

  • Poster Presentation

Session Introduction

David R Irvine

University of the West of England, United Kingdom

Title: The Study of Zirconia Crown Milling
Biography:

David R Irvine has completed his BSc from University of the West of England. He is research student in the area of manufacture specifically tool design. He has worked closely with research throughout his academies at both Plymouth and UWE.

Abstract:

In the dental sector crowns are now being made from milled Zirconia as it has very favourable wear properties this however makes zirconia very hard on the tools used during the machining process, this of course leads to short tool life. The natural resistance combined with the unusual geometry of teeth also leads to longer than necessary tooling time. The aim of this paper is to outline improvements to the process to increase tool life and decrease machining time. It will do this first through tool geometries as most of the wear can be reduced this way including an investigation into the effects of tool coating when machining zirconia and then through the use of Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) to manage cutting condition and cutting paths to improve the speed while maintaining the extended tool life. To assess the machining of the zirconia a test was set up using a Computer-Numerical-Control (CNC) router to perform tool life test on an selection of tools both coated and uncoated from various manufacturers maintaining a close coherence to ISO: 8688-1989 this will gives both a deeper understanding into the cutting mechanics of zirconia and an insight into what effects the current geometries being used have. This information was then used to analyse what geometries are favourable for machining zirconia and to suggest what conditions it should be performed under.

Biography:

L A Hof, MSc is pursuing his Doctoral research in Mechanical Engineering at Concordia University, Canada, on nanoparticle imprinting on glass substrates by Spark Assisted Chemical Engraving. He obtained his Master (with Honours) and Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering, Advanced Mechatronics, in 2004 from Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, and did his Master research on 3D micro-structuring of glass at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland. He is winner of several awards including the prestigious doctoral Quebec Merit FQRNT award, was nominated for the Vanier CGS and wrote more than 15 journal and conference papers. His research interests include: micro-/nano systems and advanced manufacturing processes.

Abstract:

Glass is used as material for MEMS in industry and academia. This is mainly because of its unique properties, like optical transparency and chemically inertness. However, the hardness and brittleness of glass complicates its micro-fabrication. In particular, smooth, high aspect-ratio microstructures are difficult to obtain. Among micromachining methods, Spark Assisted Chemical Engraving (SACE) has a strong potential to fulfill these requirements. Glass machining by SACE occurs due to thermally promoted etching. In this contribution, a recent finding in SACE will be explored. Preliminary experimental results show the unique feature that a chemical bond can be formed, similar to anodic bonding, between the tool-electrode and glass substrate when an appropriate force and temperature, typically around 300°C, is applied. This ‘bonding temperature’ can be controlled by the machining voltage and tool-sample pressing time onto the substrate. Currently, this bonding phenomenon is very sensitive to machining parameters and its fundamentals are not yet well understood. Research is needed to explore this phenomenom more deeply and to define a work space for machining parameter settings where the tool-glass bond can be achieved. This work aims to record clear measurable bonding forces by conducting experiments whereby the tool size and the machining prameters that affect the bonding force (including electrolyte type, machining voltage, machining force and duration of tool-glass contact) will be varied. A dimensionless correlation is established between the tool dimension and the mentioned machining variables towards getting a deeper insight about the nature of this phenomenon and its influence on the SACE machining process.

Biography:

Javaid Butt is currently awaiting viva for his PhD from Anglia Ruskin University in the field of Additive Manufacturing. He has published 3 research papers in reputed journals and presented one research paper at an international conference. He has won best presentation and best poster awards at a number of intra-university conferences.

Abstract:

The majority of additive manufacturing methods use specific materials for the production of parts. The current methods employing powder metals have their limitations and are very expensive. This research presents a novel additive manufacturing process for the generation of high quality metal and composite parts. The process, referred to as Composite Metal Foil Manufacturing, is a blend of laminated object manufacturing and brazing. A calculated model of a machine in view of the new process has been outlined and its parts accepted for usefulness either by experimentation or recreations. The viability of the new process is accepted with comparative tensile testing. Distinctive metals, including copper and aluminum were used to demonstrate the adaptability of the process. The tensile testing demonstrated that the parts created by the process had fracture values that were 11%, 8% and 11% higher than the parent copper, aluminum and composite examples individually. These outcomes show that the new process is not just fit for delivering astounding metal parts efficiently but can create more grounded parts contrasted with customary subtractive techniques. The additive manufacturing identified with the generation of metal parts using the new process can work with an extensive variety of metals under typical conditions regardless of their joining capabilities. The feedback that parts delivered by added substance fabricating techniques are not sufficiently solid for genuine applications which can without much of a stretch be hushed with the results. Applications can extend from small bespoke parts to large scale functional products that can be utilized with no post handling.

Biography:

Zhong-Jin Wang is a Professor and Doctoral Tutor of Harbin Institute of Technology, China. His research interest is Viscous Pressure Forming (VPF), Smart Material Flexible Die Forming and Electrical Plastic Forming. Over 50 papers have been published in SCI and EI source journals by his research group.

Abstract:

Previous studies on viscous pressure bulging (VPB) tests show that the formability of sheet metal varies with the viscosity of pressure-carrying medium, i.e., viscous medium. Altering the viscosity of viscous medium in different stages of the process may improve the formability. However, it is impractical to implement. In order to change the viscosity of pressure-carrying medium in a single process, magneto-rheological (MR) fluids are employed in this work instead of viscous medium. The flow or shear properties of MR fluids can be continuously and reversibly controlled by the application of external magnetic field since MR fluids are essentially suspensions of magnetically polarizable particles in viscous fluids. In this paper, the squeezing tests of MR fluids are conducted at first. The increase of forming load with the magnetic flux density indicates the adjustable rheological properties. Bulging tests of Al1060 sheet and 1Cr18Ni9Ti sheet are carried out under different magnetic field. The Automated Strain Analysis and Measurement Environment (ASAME) is adopted to evaluate the thickness strain of specimens. Experimental results show that the dome height and maximum thickness strain of specimens increases with the magnetic flux density. It is result from the viscosity increase of MR fluids under increasing external magnetic field. It is inferred that MR fluids may become a promising pressure-carrying medium to improve the formability of sheet metal. Extensive application of MR fluids on the manufacture of complex-shaped shell components, which demands the enlarged forming range of sheet metal, will be expectable.

Abdelkader Saoula

Ibn Khaldoun University of Tiaret, Algeria

Title: Lateral buckling of box beam elements under combined
Biography:

Abdelkader Saoula is a State Engineer in Civil Engineering since 2001, engineering’s option roads and bridges. Then he had his Magister Diploma in 2005, a diploma in Post-graduation in Civil Engineering, Structure Option, subject magister was on the use of expert systems for diagnosis of bridges. He has completed his PhD, option structures and materials, from Djilali Liabes (Algeria) University of Civil Engineering. His doctoral thesis is on the study of the instability of steel beams- the subject was an analytical and numerical study using the software ABAQUS.

Abstract:

The effect of distortional deformation on the elastic lateral buckling of thin-walled box beam elements under combined bending and axial forces is investigated in this paper. For the purpose, an analytical model is developed for the stability of laterally unrestrained box beams according to higher order theory. Ritz and Galerkin’s methods are applied in order to discretize the governing equilibrium equations and then the buckling loads are obtained by requiring the singularity of the tangential stiffness matrix. The different solutions are discussed and then compared to the finite element simulation using Abaqus software where shell elements are used in the mesh process. The numerical results reveal that classical stability solutions as those adopted in Eurocode 3 overestimate the real lateral buckling resistance of thin-walled box beam members, particularly for the ones with high ratios between the height and the thickness of the cross-section. Numerical study of incidence of compressive forces on lateral buckling resistance of thin-walled box beam is investigated.

Biography:

Osmani is a State Engineer in Civil Engineering since 2008, engineering’s option road and bridges. Then he had his Magister Diploma in 2012, a diploma in Post-graduation in Civil Engineering, Mechanics and Structural Stability option, subject magister was on the study of the behavior of steel and composite steel - concrete beams with openings in the web, the subject was an analytical and numerical study using the software Castem. Currently, he is a PHD student in Civil Engineering, option structures and materials. His doctoral thesis is on the study of the instability of steel slender beams. He is working on analytical and numerical studies using the Abaqus software.

Abstract:

Openings in the web of the metal sections can be created to pass the technical equipment of buildings instead of passing them below the beams, which reduces the height of the floor. The reduction of the building height reduces its external and its interior volume, which lowers the operational costs and maintenance, as well as the costs of construction. Negative side, the openings in the web can significantly reduce the shear strength and the flexural strength of the steel and composite beams. This study focuses on a numerical finite element analysis of the behavior of steel beams with web openings. The numerical analysis is based on a three-dimensional model with 20 nodes volume elements using software Cast3m based on the finite element method. The model takes into account the non-linearities material and geometric (plasticity and large displacements). This model is calibrated on the basis of analytical and experimental results given in the literature. From the numerical model, an analysis of the influence of the shape of the openings on the behavior of steel beams with web openings is made. This study will quantify the effects of these parameters on the overall behavior of the element and the structure and draw conclusions and recommendations to give engineers a simple calculation for this type of element increasingly used in construction.

Biography:

Nodari Natenadze was awarded the Degree of Master of Engineering in Agricultural Mechanization by Decision №15-04/205 of 05 August 2013 of the Faculty of Engineering Technology (Agricultural University of Georgia). Currently, he is pursuing PhD engineering program in same University. Meanwhile, he is working as a Chief Specialist in agricultural engineering division of the Scientific Research Center of Agriculture. Also he is working in Agricultural University of Georgia as a Laboratory Assistant. He is the winner of Shota Rustaveli National Scientific Foundation’s 2015 PhD program, as a project name: “Improving Potato Harvesting Machinery Technology Based on the Constrictive Modernization of Picker's Acting Body for Georgian Soil Conditions”. He has published 5 papers in proceeding of the international conferences. He is the author of 4 inventions and has obtained patents for each of them.

Abstract:

Due to climate change impacts, harvesting root crops with the help of machines is complicated, especially during work in heavy physical and mechanical composition of soil. During harvesting time, due to non-optimal conditions of soil, increased traction resistance forces, with no sufficient break up of cut layer of soil, significantly determines the reduction of quality indicators of harvesting technology. Digger blades of the existing harvesting machinery cannot manage sufficient break up of soil, to compensate this, it is made by increasing vibration frequency and amplitude of the separators. Because of this, mechanical damage of bulbs by machines increases and also increases required power of the vehicle. In order to solve the current problems, vibratory digger blade was developed which was mounted on exiting potato harvester produced by Grimme (RL 1700). The prototype has independent oscillatory input, which vibrate the whole “curve shape” blades horizontally. The oscillatory input is made of the eccentric shaft, with an attached digger blade. The direction of vibration and tilt angle of the blades can be changed from a special regulatory mechanism. It will be used in late field experiments to determine the effect of vibration on the dependent variables of draft, torque and soil break-up. Laboratory examination of mechanism is done at this time and field test is scheduled for later. Theoretically, mutual dependence between technology and design parameters of the vibratory digger blades of root crops harvester was established. Optimization of the parameters occurred by processing of the influencing factors using the theory of Similarity and dimensions. Simulation of machines working and parameters of mathematical analysis was used for the following computer programs: MSC software and Matlab.

Biography:

Wassila Issaadi is a young and now PhD candidate in Department of Automatics, Electronics and Telecommunications, University of Bejaia and will receive her PhD degree in September, 2016 at the age of 25 years. Her current research interests include Robotics, Automatics, adaptive and robust control, Photovoltaics and its Controls, Artificial Neural Network and Fuzzy Logic Theory.  Now she work as reviewer in renowned journals: Energy Strategy (Elsevier), International Journal of Renewable Energy Research-IJRER Cited in SCOPUS, EBSCO and Thomson Reuters and International Journal of Energy Research (Wiley) and many others journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

With the arrival of the new millennium, the debate on the energetic future of our planet has been increased, taking in account the continually increasing needs in this field and the consequences that may result in the medium term. Indeed, demographic growth and energetic requirements of industrialized societies are increasing. In addition, developing countries will need more and more energy to complete their development. Otherwise the world will be in need of new safe, clean and economical energetic source, to satisfy its needs. In fact, the solar energy is an excellent natural renewable energy source, offering great potential and can be used while respecting the environment. A significant number of MPPT control technique have been developed since the 70s , starting with simple techniques such as MPPT controllers based on the return status of the voltage and current. In recent years more robust technical commands were associated with MPPT control such as Fuzzy Logic to increase the efficiency of the solar panels. This work presents the principle of command MPPT. Most used control technology of MPPT are reviewed and studied, such as: Observation and Disturbance (O&P), Incrementing Conductance (IC) and Fuzzy Logic. The objective of this study is the association of the command by the Fuzzy Logic to MPPT control and analyze and compare its behavior in relation to other techniques (O&P, IC) used in the control of the systems photovoltaic.